ACADEMIC INFORMATION


Student Responsibility for Program Requirements

All students are responsible for knowing the academic regulations of SCC, for maintaining their academic standing, and for meeting all graduation requirements for their program of study. Advisors will assist in course planning and program completion, but the final responsibility rests with the students.

Student Course Load

Students who register for more than 19 credit hours must obtain permission from the appropriate division chair/director. Dual enrolled high school students are allowed to take 18 credit hours per semester. Students wishing to take additional hours must obtain permission from the high school principal or designee and the Vice President of Student Services.

Student Classification

Students may be classified as described below. 

  • Full-Time Student…

a student enrolled for 12 or more credit hours per semester.

  • Part-Time Student…

a student enrolled for less than 12 credit hours per semester.

  • Freshman…

a student who has earned less than 32 credit hours.

  • Sophomore…

a student who has earned 32 or more credit hours.

  • Special Student…

a student taking individual credit courses but not working toward a degree. When a special student has accumulated 12 credit hours or more, he/she is encouraged to enter an academic program. A special student is generally not eligible for many types of financial assistance.

GRADUATE GUARANTEE

The college guarantees that graduates who have passed any technical or vocational course offered by the college with at least a “C” grade will have the skills and knowledge taught in that course as described in the course syllabus and that a graduate will be able to apply these skills and this knowledge effectively in the appropriate work environment. Should a graduate not be able to fulfill the promise of this guarantee within one calendar year of graduation and within three years of completing the course, then the college will allow the student to either retake that course or take an equivalent course at the college with no additional charge. A “graduate” is defined as an individual who has received either a vocational diploma or a degree from the college. (Procedure 3.01.08)

Advising

SCC students are assigned a program advisor to help them make program decisions and plan their course schedules. Program advising is a collaborative partnership between the student and the advisor. Though program advisors are available to assist students, students are ultimately responsible for monitoring their degree plans and making academic progress. Students are urged to meet with their advisors regularly and before changing their schedules, adding or dropping courses, or changing their program of study. For students planning to transfer to a four-year college or university, their advisor will assist in advising students in accordance with the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (CAA) between UNC System and the Community College System. To ensure advisement time, students should schedule appointments with their advisors.

Course Audits

Auditing is taking a course without receiving credit. A notation of the audited course, represented by “AU,” will be made on the student’s permanent record. Audit units do not count toward full-time status needed to meet health insurance and scholarship requirements; do not earn credit toward graduation requirements; do not count toward the determination of continuous enrollment for catalog purposes; and are not eligible for financial aid and veteran benefits. Audits are limited based on space availability in the classroom. Clinical courses cannot be audited.

To audit a course, students must first obtain permission from the instructor using the Audit Request Form obtained in the registrar’s office. Students undergo the same registration procedure and pay the same fees as for-credit courses. Auditing students must meet all course requisite and admission requirements. Changes from audit to credit or from credit to audit must be accomplished by the ten percent date of the course.

Students auditing a course must abide by the attendance policy and may be expected, at the discretion of the instructor, to complete the same requirements as those taking the course for credit. Audit students who fail to attend classes on a regular basis may be withdrawn with a grade of W for exceeding authorized absences. Dropping and withdrawing from an audit course is governed by the same procedures as dropping and withdrawing from a course taken for credit.

Directed Independent Study

Directed Independent Study is a way for students to learn course content and receive academic credit under the direction of a faculty member.  This is allowed under special circumstances.  Students should contact the relevant department chair for more information about requesting an independent study. 

All independent study contracts must be processed in the registrar’s office, along with an official registration/add form. Before enrolling students in independent study courses, instructors should contact the appropriate division chair or director to discuss the situation. If both agree that independent study is the best option, then the following procedure should be followed:

  1. The instructor for the course must complete the contract before the advisor and student plan the student’s schedule. The student must take the schedule and the independent study contract to the registrar’s office for processing.
  2. At the end of the semester, the instructor should forward to the division chair or director the documented number of hours that the instructor has spent with the student.

College Split Courses

In some cases, the college may split a course into segments to facilitate scheduling and/or to maximize enrollment capacity. All parts of these split courses must be completed in the offered groupings to receive credit for the whole course. If a course group is not completed as offered the entire group must be retaken in the future to receive the whole course credit. Split courses are offered as simultaneously scheduled parts or sequentially scheduled parts. Courses split in two parts are identified by AB and BB suffixes; courses split in three parts as AC, BC, CC.

Example 1: BIO 168AB and BIO 168BB are offered in a fall term. Both must be completed to receive credit for BIO 168. If an unsatisfactory grade is received in one of the two parts, both parts must be taken again in a future term to receive credit for BIO 168.

Example 2: AHR 112AB and AHR 112BB are offered with one in the fall term and one in the spring term. If the student successfully completes AHR 112AB in the fall but is unsuccessful in AHR 112BB in the spring, they have not successfully completed AHR 112 and will need to take both parts again if the course is offered in a split format in the future.

Course Substitutions

A set of courses, including a set of one course, may be substituted for a required set of courses, including a set of one course, in a curriculum if the set being substituted is the functional equivalent of the required set. In no case will substitutions be permitted which would allow completion of a program without meeting all student learning outcomes for that program. Specific course requirements mandated by the State of North Carolina for a particular program may not be substituted. All substitutions must be approved by the program faculty, the associated curriculum division chair/director, and the vice president of academic affairs.

Changing Program

Students wishing to change their program of study should make an appointment with student services.

Removing an Incomplete Grade

A temporary grade of I may be assigned when at least 85 percent of the course work has been completed. Work must be finished by the sixth week of the following semester (fall, spring, summer) unless an earlier completion date is set. Failure to complete the work by the designated date will result in an F in the course. The course is not considered for GPA until the course is completed.

Request for a Grade Change Policy

Students requesting grade changes on their transcripts should initiate the requests within the semester following the one in which the grades were received. Students must contact instructors to initiate the changes.

Course Syllabi

Course syllabi are made available in Ram’s Online for every curriculum course. The core syllabus contains, at a minimum, an identification of any prerequisites or corequisites, a course description, the course objectives, a course outline, the course requirements, the grading criteria, a statement indicating how student success will be measured (for example, any pretest and post-test measures), a general statement on student access to instructors, a statement relating to accommodations for students with a disability, the college policy on minimum attendance requirements, and a listing of supplemental resources and additional information. This core syllabus is the same for any section of a particular course. The core syllabus may contain other information which is common among all sections of a course.  Along with the syllabus, an addendum prepared by the individual faculty member which gives specific information on student access to the instructor, specific information on the instructor’s attendance and lateness policy, information on textbooks and/or other required materials, and other information, which may include, but not be limited to, a specific course outline with dates various topics will be covered, the projected dates for tests and/or examinations, due dates for assignments, and any other information the instructor wants students to know at the beginning of the course.

The core syllabus will not change during the term unless changes in college policy/procedures or in knowledge on the topics covered necessitate a change, but the information in the addendum is subject to change. The instructor will notify students of any changes either orally or in writing as early as practicable. Instructors will make every effort to keep changes to a minimum but reserve the right to adjust the course as circumstances or needs dictate. Students are responsible for learning about changes if they miss a class period in which a change was announced or given in writing.

Attendance

Students are expected to attend all lecture and laboratory sessions and participate in all electronic forums in courses for which they are registered. Absences interfere with the students’ progress and reduce the quality of classroom interaction. Instructors are required to drop all students who never attend a course prior to the 10 percent of the course. Instructors may elect to drop students whose absences exceed 5 percent of all scheduled contact hours for the course. Absences are counted from the first class meeting of the semester.

Students who miss class due to participation in an official college function must notify the instructor prior to the absence. (An official college function is one that has been approved by the appropriate college vice president.) Under normal circumstances, the absence should not result in the students’ total absences exceeding the maximum allowed by the course syllabus. If, however, the absence would result in a violation of the class attendance policy, then students must obtain written approval from the class instructor in order to be eligible to participate in the official college function.

Attendance requirements for each class are found in the course syllabus. In addition, rules governing tardiness and leaving class early are addressed in each instructor’s addendum to the syllabus.

Grading System

Student grades are available electronically after the end of the semester. End-of-semester grades become a part of student’s permanent record.

Grade Explanation

SCC uses a 4.0-point system of grading:

Grade

A

Explanation

Excellent

Quality Points/Credit Hour

4.0

B Good 3.0
C Average 2.0
D Poor, but passing 1.0
F Failure 0.0

Other grades which may appear on grade reports or transcripts (No quality points are awarded.):

AU – Audit…Grade for those who register and complete a course as auditing students.

P – Passed…Grade for students in developmental coursework that indicates they have met the outcomes for the course and may now proceed to the next level developmental course or college gateway course.

I – Incomplete…Temporary grade (85 percent of course work completed). Work must be finished by the sixth week of the following semester (fall, spring, summer) unless an earlier completion date is set. Failure to complete the work by the designated date will result in an “F” in the course.

Incompletes are not considered in the calculation of GPA until the course is completed.

R – Repeat…Grade indicating that a student in a developmental course has not completed all required work to receive credit but should complete the requirements in a subsequent attempt progressing at the same rate. Note: For financial aid calculations, this grade is considered to be equivalent to a withdrawal.

RA-RF – Removed from GPA…An “R” preceding a previously assigned grade, which results from students’ applying for and being awarded Academic Fresh Start status.

W – Withdrawal…Assigned when students withdraw or are withdrawn from a course by their instructor prior to the exam period.

Computation of Grade Point Average (GPA) 

The letter grade in each course is converted to a quality point equivalent. The quality points arethen multiplied by the semester hours. The total quality points for all courses are then divided by the total credit hours attempted to give the GPA.

Example:

ENG 111 A 4.0 x 3= 12
BIO 163 B 3.0 x 5= 15
PSY 150 C 2.0 x 3= 6
TOTALS 11= 33

A cumulative grade point average of 2.0 (C) or better is required for graduation in all programs. A lower GPA will also affect financial aid eligibility. Grades of W, I, NA, AU and CR are not counted as hours attempted in calculating the GPA. If grades are changed, the GPA will be recomputed.

Statements concerning academic honors, academic high honors, academic warning, or academic probation appear on the grade transcript for the appropriate term in which the status was earned.  These statements will not be removed from the transcript by students improving their grade point average by repeating a class.

Repeating a Class

Students who earn a grade below a “C” in a course or who completed the course five or more years earlier will be allowed to repeat the course.  Additionally, students may repeat a course if mandated by their program of study. The last grade earned will be the grade of record for the course.  The Vice President of Academic Affairs may approve any exceptions on acase-by-case basis.

Students transferring courses to other institutions may find that the receiving institutions calculate the GPA based on all grades.

ACADEMIC FREEDOM

If a student feels that his/her academic freedom has been challenged or inappropriately restrained, he/she has the right to seek redress by filing a complaint using the college’s grievance procedures.  Policy 3.05  Procedure 3.05.01  Procedure 3.05.02

GENERAL EDUCATION

Definition

General education is the part of a student’s education that assures that all graduates with a degree or diploma receive an appropriately broad and deep exposure to knowledge not specifically related to their field of study.  General education is the part of a student’s education that assures that all graduates with a degree or diploma receive an appropriately broad and deep exposure to knowledge not specifically related to their field of study.  Each degree offered by the college requires a minimum of 15 semester hours of general education classes.  This requirement is designed to ensure that Associate degree graduates learn to communicate effectively and have exposure to the broad disciplines of human thought including communications, humanities/fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, and natural sciences/mathematics.  This general education requirement is designed to produce graduates who have a well-rounded education, which complements the specific skills they may learn relevant to their particular discipline  

Inclusion in Degrees and Diplomas

General education is an essential part of all degrees and diplomas at Southeastern Community College. Each degree or diploma meets general education outcomes (competencies) at a level appropriate for that degree or diploma, either at the college level, degree level, or transfer level. 

All transfer degrees contain a minimum of 45 semester hours of courses designated as general education including at least 6 hours in communications, 6 hours in humanities/fine arts, 6 hours in social/behavioral sciences, 3 hours in mathematics, and 4 hours in natural sciences. This is in accord with the standards set by the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement between the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) and the University of North Carolina System, as well as between the NCCCS and the North Carolina Association of Independent Colleges and Universities in the Independent Comprehensive Articulation Agreement. All general education outcomes are met through taking appropriate courses to complete the transfer degree. 

All other degrees – associate in applied science and associate in general education – contain a minimum of 15 semester hours of general education courses and meet the general education outcomes at a level appropriate for associate degree recipients.  

All diplomas must contain a minimum of 6 semester hours of general education courses. These programs will meet the general education outcomes at a level appropriate for diploma recipients. 

General Education Outcomes

The general education outcomes with explanations are as follows: 

Demonstrate college-level communication skills (writing and speaking). Communication skills are those learned behaviors which enable individuals to effectively gather, assimilate, process, and disseminate information. Demonstration of the skills indicates that students can write and speak at the college level. 

Demonstrate quantitative and scientific literacy. Quantitative and scientific literacy refer to understanding the use of processes, procedures, or evidence to solve problems or make effective decisions. Demonstration indicates students solve problems or make decisions employing processes, procedures, data, or evidence. 

Expectations of Students

Appropriate Academic Behaviors

In order to create the most effective classroom environment possible to support learning, faculty and administration expect the following behaviors from students:

  1. Academic Participation. Students should express their views in classroom discussions in an appropriate manner. Students should also listen respectfully to others expressing their opinions and ideas. The exchange of ideas in a non-combative, non-abusive, and orderly manner is essential for learning and fundamental to academic freedom.
  2. Academic Environment. Students should not disrupt the learning environment through any inappropriate behavior. It is the responsibility of the instructor to ensure that the appropriate learning environment exists in the class and remove any student who disrupts the climate and interferes with other students’ right to learn.
  3. Academic Courtesy. Students should be in class for the complete class session. Entering a classroom late or leaving early is disruptive to the instructor and other students. If rare instances make students late for class, they should enter quietly, be seated as close to the door as possible, and draw as little attention as possible. Students should never leave early without the instructor’s permission. Students should see the instructor after class to explain their lateness; the instructor may have already taken attendance.
  4. Academic Responsibility. Students bear the responsibility for knowing what was covered in a missed class. They should inform an instructor before being absent from a class, if possible. Students have the responsibility to find out in advance, if possible, the assignments and activities for the missed class. Students are responsible for arranging any make up work and completing assignments due at the next class period. Students should not expect to be able to make up all work missed, especially unannounced quizzes or tests. Students are responsible for knowing what was covered in the missed class and getting notes from other classmates. It is not the responsibility of the instructor to re-teach what was missed. An individual instructor’s policies may be more lenient than the above, but it is still a student responsibility to learn what was missed. Students should understand that faculty are in the classroom to aid them in learning, but that faculty also have the responsibility of certifying that students have met the required outcomes of the course. Ultimately, students are responsible for their own learning.
  5. Academic Focus. Students must focus on class activities while in class. They must not work on non-related activities or sleep. If internet use is a part of the class, students should use it only for class prescribed activities.
  6. Academic Exchange. Students need to be prepared for a class to learn effectively. There cannot be an effective exchange between an instructor and students without this preparation. Being prepared means reading any assigned work for the class and noting questions or reactions to the reading, preparing any requested written work, or preparing questions to ask in the class. Students always have homework in a class even if nothing is specifically assigned. At the least, students should review previous class notes to check their understanding and be prepared to ask clarifying questions during the next class session.

General Expectations

Either inside the classroom or in any activities on campus or in other facilities where the college carries out classes or activities, students should observe the following:

  1. Students should have food or drink only in appropriate locations. Food and drink are not permitted in classrooms, labs, or the auditorium.
  2. Students should treat each other and all college personnel with respect in all interactions.
  3. On-campus Basic Skills students must abide by the rules stated in their signed agreement form entitled, “SCC Basic Skills Program On-Campus Rules,” in addition to the expectations stated in this section and the section above.
  4. Students must abide by all policies and procedures governing their behavior in the Policies and Procedures, the Student Handbook, and in the Catalog.

Access to Student Records
Notification of Rights under FERPA

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords eligible students certain rights with respect to their education records. (An “eligible student” under FERPA is a student who is 18 years of age or older or who attends a postsecondary institution at any age.) These rights include:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days after the day Southeastern Community College (SCC) receives a request for access. A student should submit to the registrar a written request that identifies the record(s) the student wishes to inspect. The school official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the school official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
  2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights under FERPA.

A student who wishes to ask SCC to amend a record should write the SCC registrar clearly identify the part of the record the student wants changed, and specify why it should be changed.

If SCC decides not to amend the record as requested, SCC will notify the student in writing of the decision and the student’s right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

  1. The right to provide written consent before SCC discloses personally identifiable information (PII) from the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.

SCC discloses education records without a student’s prior written consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official typically includes a person employed by SCC in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel); a person serving on the board of trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee. A school official also may include a volunteer or contractor outside of the SCC who performs an institutional service of function for which the school would otherwise use its own employees and who is under the direct control of the school with respect to the use and maintenance of PII from education records, such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent or a student volunteering to assist another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official typically has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibilities for SCC.

  1. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by SCC to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is:

Student Privacy Policy Office

U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202

FERPA permits the disclosure of PII from students’ education records, without consent of the student, if the disclosure meets certain conditions found in § 99.31 of the FERPA regulations. Except for disclosures to school officials, disclosures related to some judicial orders or lawfully issued subpoenas, disclosures of directory information, and disclosures to the student, § 99.32 of FERPA regulations require the institution to record the disclosure. Eligible students have a right to inspect and review the record of disclosures. A postsecondary institution may disclose PII from the education records without obtaining the prior written consent of the student —

  • To other school officials, including faculty, within SCC whom the school has determined to have legitimate educational interests. This includes contractors, consultants, volunteers, or other parties to whom the school has outsourced institutional services or functions, provided that the conditions listed in § 99.31(a)(1)(i)(B)(1) – (a)(1)(i)(B)(3) are met. (§ 99.31(a)(1))
  • To officials of another school where the student seeks or intends to enroll, or where the student is already enrolled if the disclosure is for purposes related to the student’s enrollment or transfer, subject to the requirements of § 99.34. (§ 99.31(a)(2))
  • To authorized representatives of the U. S. Comptroller General, the U.S. Attorney General, the U.S. Secretary of Education, or State and local educational authorities, such as a State postsecondary authority that is responsible for supervising the college’s State-supported education programs. Disclosures under this provision may be made, subject to the requirements of §99.35, in connection with an audit or evaluation of Federal- or State-supported education programs, or for the enforcement of or compliance with Federal legal requirements that relate to those programs. These entities may make further disclosures of PII to outside entities that are designated by them as their authorized representatives to conduct any audit, evaluation, or enforcement or compliance activity on their behalf. (§§ 99.31(a)(3) and 99.35)
  • In connection with financial aid for which the student has applied or which the student has received, if the information is necessary to determine eligibility for the aid, determine the amount of the aid, determine the conditions of the aid, or enforce the terms and conditions of the aid. (§ 99.31(a)(4))
  • To organizations conducting studies for, or on behalf of, the school, in order to: (a) develop, validate, or administer predictive tests; (b) administer student aid programs; or (c) improve instruction. (§ 99.31(a)(6))
  • To accrediting organizations to carry out their accrediting functions. (§ 99.31(a)(7))
  • To parents of an eligible student if the student is a dependent for IRS tax purposes. (§ 99.31(a)(8))
  • To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena. (§ 99.31(a)(9))
  • To appropriate officials in connection with a health or safety emergency, subject to § 99.36. (§ 99.31(a)(10))
  • Information the school has designated as “directory information” under § 99.37. (§ 99.31(a)(11))
  • To a victim of an alleged perpetrator of a crime of violence or a non-forcible sex offense, subject to the requirements of § 99.39. The disclosure may only include the final results of the disciplinary proceeding with respect to that alleged crime or offense, regardless of the finding. (§ 99.31(a)(13))
  • To the general public, the final results of a disciplinary proceeding, subject to the requirements of § 99.39, if the school determines the student is an alleged perpetrator of a crime of violence or non-forcible sex offense and the student has committed a violation of the school’s rules or policies with respect to the allegation made against him or her. (§ 99.31(a)(14))
  • To parents of a student regarding the student’s violation of any Federal, State, or local law, or of any rule or policy of the school, governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance if the school determines the student committed a disciplinary violation and the student is under the age of 21. (§99.31(a)(15))

Approved 06.15.2020 

Effective Immediately

Retention and Disposition of Student Records

Retention and disposition of records maintained by admissions and the registrar’s office are handled in accordance with the schedules published in the Public Records Retention and Disposition Schedules as prepared by the North Carolina Community College System and the State Board of Community Colleges for institutions in the community college system.

TRANSCRIPTS

Students who wish to have an official transcript mailed to another institution or potential employer must request the transcript by one of the methods below.

ELECTRONIC ORDERING OPTIONS:

Electronic – When placing your order online, you can select a paperless option for your official transcript. Before placing your order, find out from the recipient whether an electronic transcript is acceptable and if so, the email address you should use for delivery. Once your order has been placed, the recipient will be notified by email that a certified PDF from our transcript ordering service can be retrieved. Please note that this option is not available for those who attended the college prior to 1997.

Mail – Official paper transcripts are mailed using standard delivery through the U.S. Postal Service. Paper transcript requests will normally be processed within two business days. However, a longer period of time may be required for processing at the beginning and end of a semester. The fee for an official paper transcript ordered via the online service is $5.00.

Office Options:
On-demand – An official paper transcript can be requested on-demand during normal business operating hours in the Registrar’s Office. The request must be made in person and will require a valid photo identification. The service will not be available during the two days prior to the start of the fall, spring and summer terms. The charge for an on-demand transcript is $5.00.

Office request – An official paper transcript can be requested in the Registrar’s Office for free. This request must be made in person and is only available for mailed or hold for pick-up paper transcripts. Paper transcripts will be processed within two business days. However, a longer period of time may be required for processing at the beginning and end of a semester. Electronic transcripts are not available using this process.

Credit for Courses Not Completed at SCC

Students seeking to transfer course work should note that they must earn at least twenty-five percent of the hours required in their degree program at SCC. This policy applies no matter how many hours are awarded through transcript evaluation or other forms of credit. Students need to be aware that awarding of credit for courses not taken at SCC does not guarantee that those courses will be accepted by another institution of higher learning. Each institution sets its own policies.

Credit for Coursework from Other Colleges and Universities Taken Before Admission to Southeastern Community College (Transcript Evaluation)

  1. Other than the exceptions listed below, SCC accepts all courses from a North Carolina community college with a grade of A, B, or C for transfer if they are in the Combined Course Library.
    1. Transfer of nursing and health technologies program courses have additional requirements listed in Item 2c below.
    2. If SCC does not offer the courses, students receive elective credits, if applicable, toward specific degrees.
    3. If the courses are in a program that the college does not offer and the courses are not applicable to a degree offered, students will not receive transfer credits toward degrees.
  2. Transfer of credit from any other institution must meet the following criteria:
    1. The courses must either be taught by a college or university that is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) or one of the seven other federally recognized accrediting bodies (Middle States Commission on Higher Education, New England Association of Schools and Colleges Commission on Institutions of Higher Education, New England Association of Schools and Colleges Commission on Technical and Career Institutions, North Central Association of Colleges and Schools The Higher Learning Commission, Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, WASC Senior College and University Commission, Western Association of Schools and Colleges Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges), or the student must furnish the following for each course they want to transfer:
      • The course syllabus, which should contain a course description, course objectives, the number and type of assignments, and a topic outline
      • The number of credit and contact hours

The evaluator will use this information, along with consultation with appropriate discipline faculty to determine the transfer credit to be awarded, if any. The courses must be equivalent to courses SCC offers in content and credit hours. In some instances, students may be granted either general education credit or elective credit for courses in an area in which (e.g., science or math) the college requires specific courses, even though the college may not teach those courses.  Students may submit course syllabi for classes from the regionally accredited institutions to support their equivalence to Southeastern courses.

  1. Grades for transferable courses must be A, B, or C. Grades of D, F, S, or P are not accepted. (Numerical grades will transfer if they are equivalent to A, B, or C on the transcript legend.)
  2. Students desiring to transfer courses into a nursing or health technologies program must meet the following criteria:
    • Meet with an admission staff member to verify that all program admission requirements have been met.
    • Have been enrolled in an approved or accredited program at the former institution within the past twelve months.
    • Have written verification of good academic standing and consistently safe clinical performance from the former institution’s program director.
    • Have nursing courses evaluated by the director of nursing. To be eligible to transfer, the courses must be equivalent to courses offered at SCC in both theory and clinical experience.
    • Enter the nursing or health technology program at SCC within twelve months of leaving the former institution.
    • Understand that nursing and health technology program courses over two years old will not be accepted for transfer, nor will courses that are in the second year of the associate degree nursing and medical laboratory technology programs.
  3. Credit for study skills or orientation courses from other than a North Carolina community college are not accepted as the equivalent of ACA 115. To receive equivalent credit to ACA 115, students must provide the transcript evaluator with course syllabi.
  4. Credit hours other than semester hours (e.g. quarter, unit) are translated to semester hours for transfer credit.
  5. College junior or senior level courses may receive transfer credit for freshman or sophomore level courses if they are equivalent to lower-level courses SCC teaches. No other upper division or graduate courses transfer.
  6. Requests for reevaluations of transcript must be made to the Director of Student Services. Students may have to present course syllabi to the transcript evaluator to challenge denials of transfer credit. The director of student services may consult with faculty who teach in specific subject areas to determine whether credit should be awarded. The Director will then inform students of the decision. Students may appeal to the Vice President of Academic Affairs whose decision is final.
  7. Credit for developmental (or remedial) courses taken prior to 1997 is not awarded.
  8. Courses may receive transfer credit but may not be acceptable in certain programs unless they were taken within a specific time period (e.g. BIO 168, Anatomy and Physiology taken more than ten years before entry into the ADN program). Students must meet program requirements for recentness of courses.
  9. Transcript evaluation usually takes two to three weeks from the date the college receives the transcript from the sending institution. Students should check with the registrar’s office to determine if their transcripts have been received by the college. If students do not receive an evaluation within three weeks of the transcripts’ arriving at the college, they should contact the registrar’s office.

Credit for Coursework taken at Other Colleges and Universities After Admissions to Southeastern Community College (Transient Coursework) 

The program’s students enroll in at SCC are designed to be taken at SCC; however, under certain circumstances, permission can be given to take courses at other institutions while attending SCC.

A student who wishes to attend another collegiate institution should contact the registrar’s office at Southeastern to secure a “Consortium Form” and with their advisor determine whether the intended transfer courses are acceptable. The completed consortium form should be taken to the appropriate Southeastern Community College division chair/director for approval. Failure to obtain prior approval may result in the coursework being unacceptable for transfer to Southeastern Community College.

In some circumstances, a student may not be permitted to take coursework at another collegiate institution while concurrently enrolled at Southeastern if the course for which the student wants transfer credit is scheduled and available at SCC during the academic term in question or if it contains general education/program-specific outcomes required for graduation.

The combined load of residence courses and transient courses in a term should not exceed the maximum load allowed. Once a student has enrolled in an SCC program, she or he should not enroll as a visiting student at another collegiate institution unless prior approval has been received from SCC.

Students wishing to apply for financial aid to attend other schools should contact the SCC Financial Aid Office after the registrar and the appropriate program chair/director sign the Consortium Form.

Curriculum Student Registration / Add / Drop / Withdrawal / Never Attend

(Procedure 3.01.10

Advising and Registration

The college provides ample opportunity for students to register for classes and encourages students to maintain regular advising appointments with advisors beyond the registration period.  Exact registration times and dates are announced in advance through campus publications. Currently enrolled students should schedule an appointment with their advisor to receive advice concerning their selection of courses and degree progress.   New or returning students should schedule an appointment with a Student Services Advisor to register for courses and to be coded into a program of study.

How students can add a class after classes have begun.

For most classes, the add period is the first two days of the semester or prior to the first day of the course. Students wishing to add a class that has met more than once must complete an Add/Withdrawal Form.

Students may not add a course after the Add Period on the Schedule of Courses unless the following procedure is followed:

  1. The student should complete the Add/Withdrawal Form, which will route to the appropriate division chair.
  2. The chair, after consulting with the faculty, should deny the request, if he or she thinks the student has missed too much class to be successful.
  3. If the chair, after consulting with the faculty, thinks the student can start the class and be successful, the chair will accept the form and discuss the petition with the Vice President of Academic Affairs (VPAA).
  4. The VPAA will either approve or deny the request and direct the chair to communicate the decision to the student.
  5. If approved, the Form will be delivered to the registrar, who will add the student to the course.
  6. If denied, the Chair will communicate the decision to the student.

How students can drop a class.

Students can drop a course prior to the census date (10% point) of a class by dropping the course in Self Service or coming to the registrar’s office and requesting a class to be dropped. Dropped courses are not recorded on students’ transcripts and are not calculated in attempted hours for student completion.

How students can withdraw from a class.

Students wishing to withdrawal from a class should complete the Add/Withdrawal Form.  After the 10% point, but before the beginning of the exam period, a grade of W will be entered on the student’s transcript.  After the exam period begins, a grade of will be issued in accordance with the grading policies and will be recorded on the students’ transcript, unless the student officially withdraws from all courses.

Never Attend – Instructors should identify students who never attend a course.

Instructors will record students’ first day of attendance in a course.  Students who never attend a course will be marked as a no show and will be removed from the course prior to the census date.

Instructors may withdrawal students with excessive absences.

Instructors may withdraw students who have excessive absences. Students withdrawn for excessive absences will receive a grade of W until the day before the exam period. After that time, instructors may issue a grade in accordance with grading policies.

How students should withdrawal from all classes.

Students desiring to completely withdraw from all classes should contact Student Services for the forms and procedures necessary for official withdrawal.  Students may withdraw from the college with a grade of W in all courses the day after the 10% date and prior to the first day of the final examination period. After the final exam period, student grades are assigned in accordance with Procedure 3.01.11.

UNDERSTANDING COURSE PREREQUISITES AND COREQUISITES

Prerequisites

Prerequisite courses are courses that must be completed before students can enroll in subsequent coursesStudents must comply with catalog requirements and courses may not be taken until all prerequisites have been met. (Exceptions may occur when students are in specially designed curricula which allow for meeting prerequisites in an alternative manner. Such programs will have been approved by the appropriate faculty and academic chair/director and authorized by the vice president of academic affairs upon the presentation of specific documentation showing how the prerequisite skills or knowledge content are being met.) Advisors will assist, but it is the responsibility of students to check course prerequisite requirements. Registering for a course without having the appropriate prerequisite will result in students being dropped from courses when the improper registrations are discovered. The removal from a course may have an effect on full-time status and/or financial aid. (Any refund will be based on the college’s current refund policy.)

If students feel that they have met a prerequisite by one of the following means, they should work with their advisor and the appropriate department chair to initiate a prerequisite wavier:

  1. A course or combination of courses taken at another institution covering the knowledge and abilities equivalent to those specified in the prerequisite course.
  2. Documented knowledge and abilities through work experience, experiential learning, or formal assessment equivalent to those specified in the prerequisite course.
  3. Professional certification and/or licensure demonstrating the knowledge and abilities equivalent to those specified in the prerequisite course.

The vice president of academic affairs shall approve or deny prerequisite waiver requests. The vice president’s decision is final.

Under no circumstance will prerequisites be waived without completion of one of the above procedures.

Corequisites

Corequisite courses are courses that must be taken at the same time as another course or prior to the course to be taken. Note: Some lecture courses having corequisite labs are “Split Courses” and must be taken together during the same semester. Additionally, the following courses with labs must be taken together: COS 111/112, COS 113/114, COS 115/116, and COS 117/118.

Students must comply with catalog requirements in that courses may not be taken without the appropriate corequisite. (Exceptions may occur when students are in specially designed curricula which allow for meeting corequisites in an alternative manner. Such programs will have been approved by the appropriate faculty and academic chair/director and authorized by the vice president of academic affairs upon the presentation of specific documentation showing how the corequisite skills or knowledge content are being met.)

Advisors will assist, but it is the responsibility of students to check course corequisite requirements. Registering for a course without having the appropriate corequisite will result in students being dropped from courses when the improper registrations are discovered. The removal from a course may affect students’ full-time status and/or financial aid. (Any refund will be based on the college’s current refund policy.)

If students feel that they have met a corequisite by one of the following means, they should work with their advisor and the appropriate division chair to initiate a corequisite waiver:

  1. A course or combination of courses taken at another institution covering the knowledge and abilities equivalent to those specified in the corequisite course.
  2. Documented knowledge and abilities through work experience, experiential learning, or formal assessment equivalent to those specified in the corequisite course.
  3. Professional certification and/or licensure demonstrating the knowledge and abilities equivalent to those specified in the corequisite course.

The Vice President of Academic Affairs shall approve or deny corequisite waiver requests. The vice president’s decision is final

The corequisite components of COS 111/112, COS 113/114, COS 115/116, and COS 117/118, may not be waived.

Under no circumstances will a corequisite be waived for other courses without completion of one of the above procedures.

Some programs/curricula have admission or continuation requirements which are not courses.  These requirements function as prerequisites which must be met. (See individual programs for specific requirements.)

Statement on Official Electronic Communications 

To ensure, that the student who registers in a distance or correspondence education course or program is the same student who participates in and completes the course or program and receives the credit, the college requires use of its official email systems. The official system for students relies on the issuance of a student identification number to all students when they are admitted to the college. Students then follow guidelines posted on the college website to create logins and passwords. No other student may be permitted to access the email system using the created logins and passwords, and students may not allow access under their individual logins and passwords.

Students and faculty communicating with each other about any course-related questions or when sending or receiving assignments must do so using college-approved email systems or through an approved college platform, such as Aviso or Rams Online.

All personnel and students must use official college communication systems when electronically communicating about college classes, activities, services, and business.

Credit for Prior Knowledge, Experience, or Certifications 

The North Carolina Community College System is drafting a new system-wide policy related to credit for prior learning.  Once this policy becomes effective, it will replace what follows.

(Policy 3.09)  Students who feel they are already proficient in a required curriculum course may receive credit for the course either through credit by exam or through professional review of certifications/experience. Students must be currently enrolled at the college in order to be eligible; however, students must not be enrolled in the course for which they are requesting credit by exam or professional review of certifications/experience. Students should complete the following steps:

  1. Request permission from the advisor. The advisor completes the appropriate form, justifying the request.
  2. Obtain permission from the division chair/director.
  3. Submit the form to the office of the Vice President of Academic Affairs. The vice-president’s office will identify the process the student needs to follow and the appropriate curriculum faculty needed to complete the examination/review. The student will also be notified of the appropriate fees. Note: Any examination or review of certification/experience requires that students have met the equivalent learning outcomes of the Southeastern course. The fees for any examination/review are based upon the cost to the institution to provide this service.
  4. Take the form to the business office and pay the fees.
  5. Take the form to the designated person to complete the examination, if credit by exam, or the review, if certifications/experience.
  6. After the exam or review is completed, the examiner will provide the result on the form to the registrar and notify the student of the outcome. Those who pass the exam or review receive course credit toward graduation requirements. The registrar will maintain the record of the exam or review in the student’s file.

Non-Course Credit (NC)

Non-course credit is assigned for credit for prior knowledge, experience or certifications; College- Level Examination Program (CLEP) tests, and certain high school tech prep and advanced placement courses. The non-course equivalency given is based on the credit hour(s) of the course(s); no grade or point value is assigned.

Credit for College Level Examination Program (CLEP) Tests

The College will award credit for CLEP tests as described in the tables below.

Business* 

Test Minimum Score SCC Course(s) Hours
Accounting, Principles of 50 ACC 120 4
Business Law, Introductory 50 BUS 115 3
Information Systems and Computer

Applications

50 CIS 110 3
Management, Principles of 50 BUS 137 3
Marketing, Principles of 50 MKT 120 3

Composition and Literature* 

Test Minimum Score SCC Course(s) Hours
American Literature 50 ENG 231, 232 6
Analyzing and Interpreting Literature 50 ENG 131 3
English Literature 50 ENG 241, 242 6
Freshman College Composition 50 ENG 111, 112 6
Humanities 50 HUM 211, 212 6

Foreign Language* 

Test Minimum Score SCC Course(s) Hours
Spanish Language, Level 1 (two semesters) 50 SPA 111, 112 6
Spanish Language, Level 2 (four semesters) 66 SPA 111, 112, 211, 212 2

 History and Social Sciences* 

Test Minimum Score SCC Course(s) Hours
American Government 50 POL 120 3
History of the United States I 50 HIS 131 3
History of the United States II 50 HIS 132 3
Human Growth and Development 50 PSY 241 3
Macroeconomics, Principles of 50 ECO 252 3
Microeconomics, Principles of 50 ECO 251 3
Psychology, Introductory 50 PSY 150 3
Social Sciences and History 50 Elective 3
Sociology, Introductory 50 SOC 210 3
Western Civilization I 50 HIS 121 3
Western Civilization II 50 HIS 122 3

Science and Mathematics* 

Test Minimum Score SCC Course(s) Hours
Biology 50 BIO 111, 112 8
Calculus 50 MAT 271 4
Chemistry 50 CHM 151, 152 8
College Algebra 50 MAT 161 3
College Mathematics 50 MAT 143 3
Precalculus 50 MAT 175 3
Natural Sciences 50 Elective 6

*Scores and credit hours awarded are based on American Council on Education (ACE) recommendations.

College Tech-Prep. Certain college tech-prep courses taken in high schools receive non-course credit under articulation agreements between SCC and the Columbus County and Whiteville City school systems.

Advanced Placement. To aid students in getting a head start on their education and in meeting degree requirements, Southeastern offers credit for Advanced Placement (AP) courses. Proper documentation must be presented to student services and the registrar’s office to receive non- course credit. Specific test scores required and matching SCC courses are provided in the table below:

 

AP Examination

Minimum Score Semester Hours  

SCC Course(s)

Art History 3 3 ART 114
Art History 5 6 ART 114, 115
Biology 3 4 BIO 111
Biology 5 8 BIO 111, 112
Calculus AB 3 4 MAT 271
Calculus BC 5 8 MAT 271, 272
Chemistry 3 4 CHM 151
Chemistry 5 8 CHM 151, 152
Computer Science A 3 3 CIS 110
Computer Science AB 5 6 to 8 To be determined
Economics: Macro 3 3 ECO 252
Economics: Micro 3 3 ECO 251
English Language and Composition 3 3 ENG 111
English Language and Composition 5 6 ENG 111, 112
Environmental Science 3 4 BIO 140/140A

 

 

AP Examination

Minimum Score Semester Hours  

SCC Course(s)

Government & Politics: Comparative 3 3 POL 210
Government & Politics: United States 3 3 POL 120
Music Theory 3 4 MUS 121
Music Theory 5 8 MUS 121, 122
Physics B 3 6 to 8 To be determined
Physics C: Mechanics 3 4 To be determined
Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism 3 4 To be determined
Psychology 3 3 PSY 150
Spanish Language 3 3 SPA 111
Spanish Language 5 6 SPA 111, 112
Statistics 3 3 MAT 152
Studio Art: Drawing 3 3 ART 131
Studio Art: Drawing 5 6 ART 131, 132
U.S. History 3 3 HIS 131
U.S. History 5 6 HIS 131, 132
World History 3 3 HIS 111
World History 5 6 HIS 111, 112

TRANSFER INFORMATION

North Carolina Community College Systems – University of North Carolina Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (CAA) 

Transfer Assured Admissions Policy (TAAP)

The TAAP assures admission to one of the 16 UNC institutions under the following conditions:

  • Admission is not assured to a specific campus or specific program or major.
  • Students must have graduated from a North Carolina community college with an associate in arts or associate in science degree.
  • Students must meet all requirements of the CAA.
  • Students must have an overall GPA of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale, as calculated by the college from which they graduated, and a grade of C or better in all CAA courses.
  • Students must be academically eligible for re-admission to the last institution attended.
  • Students must meet judicial requirements of the institution to which they apply.
  • Students must meet all application requirements at the receiving institution including the submission of all required documentation by stated deadlines.

If a student is denied admission to a UNC institution, then he or she will be notified in writing by the institution. In this notification, the student will be directed to the College Foundation of North Carolina (CFNC) website (wwww.cfnc.org) where the student will be given information regarding space availability and contacts in the respective UNC Admission offices. It is the student’s responsibility to contact each institution’s admissions office to get specific information about admission and available majors.

If the previous steps do not result in admission to a UNC institution, then the student should contact the CFNC Resource Center at 1-866-866-CFNC.

Transfer of Credits. 

The CAA establishes the procedures governing the transfer of credits for students who transfer from a North Carolina Community College to a constituent institution of The University of North Carolina. The CAA does not address admission to a specific institution or to a specific major within an institution.

Eligibility. To be eligible for the transfer of credits under the CAA, the student must graduate from the community college with an Associate in Arts (AA) or Associate in Science (AS) degree and have an overall Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale and a grade of C or better in all CAA courses. Students who do not complete the degree are eligible to transfer credits on a course- by-course basis.

Definition of the General Education Courses and Pre-Major Courses. The Associate in Arts (AA) and Associate in Science (AS) degree programs in the North Carolina Community College System require a total of 60-61 semester hours credit for graduation and are transferrable to any UNC institution. The overall total is comprised of both lower-division general education and pre-major courses. This curriculum reflects the distribution of discipline areas commonly included in institution- wide, lower-division general education requirements for the baccalaureate degree.

The Associate in Arts (AA) and Associate in Science (AS) degree programs include general education requirements that represent the fundamental foundation for success and include study in the areas of English composition, communications, humanities and fine arts, natural sciences and mathematics, and social and behavioral sciences. Within these discipline areas, community colleges must include opportunities for the achievement of competence in reading, writing, oral communication, fundamental mathematical skills, and basic computer use. Students must meet the receiving university’s foreign language and/or health and physical education requirements, if applicable, prior to or after transfer to the senior institution.

The AA and AS degree programs of study are structured to include two components:

  • Universal General Education Transfer Component comprises a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit, and
  • Additional general education, pre-major, and elective courses that prepare students for successful transfer into selected majors at UNC institutions and bring the total number of hours in the degree programs to 60-61 semester hours.

To ensure maximum transferability of credits, students should select a transfer major and preferred transfer university before completing 30 semester hours of credit. Additional general education, pre-major, and elective courses should be selected based on a student’s intended major and transfer institution.

Each receiving institution will identify community college course equivalencies and publicize an equivalency course crosswalk to ensure transfer of credit uniformity and transparency.

The specific number of distribution of courses used to fulfill the requirement in each of these areas will be identified by each community college as meeting its own general education requirements. The Universal General Education Transfer Component and Other Required General Education courses will be drawn from those courses designated in the North Carolina Community College Combined Course Library as being transferable general education. This will preserve the autonomy of each community college to develop its own general education program, including those aspects that make its program unique. Students are directed to the pre-majors for specific regarding courses and distribution.

Transfer of Associate in Arts and Associate in Science Degree Program. 

  1. The CAA enables North Carolina community college graduates of two-year Associate in Arts (AA) and Associate in Science (AS) degree programs who are admitted to constituent institutions of The University of North Carolina to transfer with junior status.
  2. Universities cannot place requirements on students transferring under the CAA that are not required of their native students.
  3. A student who completes the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree prior to transfer to a UNC institution will have fulfilled the UNC institution’s lower-division general education requirements.
  4. Due to degree requirements in some majors, additional courses at the UNC institution may be required beyond the general education courses and pre-major courses taken at the community college.
  5. Community college graduates of the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree programs who have earned 60 semester hours in approved transfer courses with a grade of C or better and an overall GPA of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale will receive at least 60 semester hours of academic credit upon admission to a UNC institution.
  6. Requirements for admission to some major programs may require additional pre-specialty courses beyond the pre-major taken at the community college. Students entering such programs may need more than two academic years of course work to complete the baccalaureate degree, depending on requirements of the program.
  7. All courses approved for transfer in the CAA are designated as fulfilling general education or pre-major/elective requirements. While general education and pre-major courses may also be used as electives, elective courses may not be used to fulfill general education requirements.
  8. CAA courses taken beyond the 60-61 SHC of credit in which the student received less than a C will not negate the provisions of the CAA.

UNC Minimum Admission Requirements (MAR) and Minimum Course Requirements (MCR). 

  1. A student who completes the Associate in Arts or the Associate in Science degree will satisfy UNC’s minimum admission requirements (MAR) and minimum course requirements (MCR).
  2. A transfer student will also be considered to have satisfied (MAR) and (MCR) if he or she has:
  3. received the baccalaureate, or any higher degree, or
  4. completed at least six (6) semester hours in degree-credit in each of the following subjects: English, mathematics, the natural sciences, and social/behavioral sciences, and (for students who graduate from high school in 2003-04 and beyond) a second language.

Student not completing the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degrees.

A North Carolina community college student who satisfactorily completes, with a grade of C or better, courses identified in the Universal General Education Transfer Component will receive credit applied toward the university’s lower-division general education course requirements, subject to the following distribution limit: maximum of 6 hours in English Composition, 9 hours in Humanities/Fine Arts/Communications, 9 hours in Social/Behavioral Sciences, 8 hours in Mathematics, and 8 hours in the Natural Sciences.

A North Carolina community college student who satisfactorily completes a transfer course that is not designated as a Universal General Education Transfer Component course will receive transfer credit for the course. The receiving institution will determine whether the course will count as general education, pre-major, or elective credit.

Certification of University General Education Transfer Component Courses, Associate in Arts Degree, or Associate in Science Degree Completion. Certification of completion of the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree is the responsibility of the community college at which the courses are successfully completed. Transcript identification of Universal General Education Transfer Component courses is also the responsibility of the community college at which the courses are completed. The transcripts of students who transfer before completing the degree will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis by the receiving university. The transferring student who has not completed the degree must meet the receiving institution’s general education requirements.

Four-Year Degree Plan for Community College Transfer Students. Beyond the Universal General Education Transfer Component courses, a program of study leading to the associate degree contains courses related to a student’s major or program emphasis. Pre-major course tracks prepare students to succeed in their chosen field and provide students with clear pathways to completion. Each UNC institution will develop, publish, and maintain four-year degree plans identifying community college course that provide pathways leading to associate degree completion, admission into the major, and baccalaureate completion. Students who complete the AA or AS degree and the degree plan tracks published by a UNC institution, and who are accepted into that institution and into that major within four years of initial enrollment at the community college, will continue into that major at the UNC institution with all courses fulfilling lower-division general education and other degree requirements.

Transfer of courses taken in other associate degree programs. Upon admission to another public two-year institution or to a public university, a community college student who was enrolled in an Associate in Applied Science (AAS) or Associate in Fine Arts (AFA) degree program and who satisfactorily completed the courses with a grade of C or better in all courses that are designated for college transfer will receive credit for those courses. AAS or AFA students completing courses designated Universal General Education Transfer Component will receive equivalent general education course credit for those courses at the receiving institution. For courses not designated as Universal General Education Transfer Component, the receiving institution will determine whether the course will count as general education or pre-major/elective credit. Students in these programs who transfer must meet the general education requirements of the receiving institution.

Articulation of Associate in Fine Arts or Associate in Applied Science degree programs may be handled on a bilateral articulation agreement basis rather than on a state-wide basis. Under bilateral agreements, individual universities and one or more community colleges may join in a collaborative effort to facilitate the transfer of students from AFA or AAS degree programs to baccalaureate degree programs.

The TAC encourages the development of new bilateral articulation agreements among institutions; however, TAC will not maintain a current inventory of bilateral articulation agreements for AAS degree programs.

Transfer of courses not originated at North Carolina Community Colleges. Transfer courses that do not originate at a North Carolina community college or UNC institution may be used under the CAA with the following stipulations:

  1. Courses must be completed at a regionally accredited (e.g., SACS) institution of higher education;
  2. Courses must meet general education requirements; and
  3. Courses may total no more than 14 semester hours of general education course credit.
  4. For courses not originating at a North Carolina community college, if the courses are used to complete the AA or AS, the courses will transfer as part of the degree. Otherwise, if 14 hours or less are presented without completion of the AA or AS, then the receiving institution will consider the courses on a course-by-course basis.

Transfer of Advanced Placement (AP) course credit. Advanced Placement (AP) course credits, awarded for a score of three or higher, are acceptable as part of a student’s successfully completed Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree under the CAA. Student who receive AP course credit at a community college but do not complete the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree will have AP credit awarded on the basis of the receiving institution’s AP policy.

Transfer Credit Appeal

If a transfer student perceives that the terms of the CAA have not been honored, he or she may follow the Transfer Credit Appeal Procedure as outlined in Appendix E of the CAA located at https://www.nccommunitycolleges.edu/sites/default/files/basic-pages/academic- programs/attachments/caa_tac_08.2016.pdf.

Students Enrolled Prior to Fall Semester 2014

Students officially enrolled in an Associate in Arts or Associate in Science program at a North Carolina community college prior to Fall Semester 2014 are subject to the conditions and protections contained in the CAA in place at the time of their initial enrollment as long as they have remained continuously enrolled.

North Carolina Community College Systems –North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities (ICAA) 

The 2015 Independent Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (ICAA) between Signatory Institutions of the North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities (NCICU) and the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) is intended to provide smooth transfer for community college students who wish to continue their education at an NCICU Signatory Institution. The ultimate goal of this agreement is the seamless articulation from the community college to the NCICU institution with minimal loss of credit or repetition of work. The Signatory Institutions which adopt this agreement do so for the benefit of the transferring student. The Signatory Institutions include Barton College, Belmont Abbey College, Bennett College, Brevard College, Campbell University, Chowan University, Gardner-Webb University, Greensboro College, Guilford College, Johnston C. Smith University, Lees-McRae College, Lenoir-Rhyne University, Livingstone College, Mars Hill University, Meredith College, Methodist University, Montreat College, North Carolina Wesleyan College, Pfeiffer University, Saint Augustine’s University, Salem College, Shaw University, St. Andrews University, University of Mount Olive, William Peace University, and Wingate University.

The ICAA rests upon assumptions common to successful articulation agreements. The primary assumption is that institutions recognize the professional integrity of other public post-secondary institutions that are regionally accredited for college transfer programs. All courses approved for college transfer under this agreement will be taught by faculty who meet the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) credential requirements. Another assumption is that substantial commonality exists in the lower-division general education requirements and courses currently offered at senior institutions and community colleges for the purpose of transfer.

The general education requirements of the receiving institutions remain in effect for all students not participating in this articulation agreement. Institution-wide, lower-division general education requirements serve as the starting point for determining specific general education courses in each baccalaureate major. The specific lower-level courses required for each major at the senior institution are determined by the senior institution and outlined in the baccalaureate degree completion plans published by the senior institution. Upper-division general education requirements and graduation requirements at the senior institution are not affected by this agreement.

Transfer of Credits

The ICAA establishes the procedures governing the transfer of credits for students who transfer from a North Carolina Community College to a signatory institution of the NCICU. The ICAA does not address admission to a specific institution or to a specific major within an institution.

EligibilityTo be eligible for the transfer of credits under the ICAA, the student must graduate from the community college with an Associate in Arts (AA) or Associate in Science (AS) degree, have an overall Grade Point Average (GPA) of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale, and a grade of C or better in all ICAA courses. Students who do not complete the degree are eligible to transfer credits on a course-by-course basis.

Definition of General Education Courses and Pre-Major Courses. The Associate in Arts (AA) and Associate in Science (AS) degree programs in the North Carolina Community College System require a total of sixty or sixty-one semester hours credit for graduation and are transferable to the Signatory Institution of North Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities. The degrees are comprised of both lower-division general education and pre-major courses. The curricula reflect the distribution of discipline areas commonly included in institution-wide, lower-division general education requirements for the baccalaureate degree.

The Associate in Arts (AA) and Associate in Science (AS) degree programs include general education requirements that represent the fundamental foundation for success and include study in the areas of English composition, communications, humanities and fine arts, natural sciences and mathematics, and social and behavioral sciences. Within these discipline areas, community colleges must include opportunities for the achievement of competence in reading, writing, oral communication, fundamental mathematical skills, and basic computer use. Students must meet the receiving senior institution’s foreign language and/or health and physical education requirements, if applicable, prior to or after transfer to the senior institution

The AA and AS degree programs of study are structured to include: 

  • the Universal General Education Transfer Component (UGETC) which includes a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit, and
  • additional general education, pre-major, and elective courses that prepare students for successful transfer into selected majors at the senior institution and bring the total number of hours in the degree programs to 60-61 semester hours.

To ensure maximum transferability of credits, students should select a transfer major and preferred transfer institution before completing 30 semester hours of credit at the community college. Each receiving senior institution will identify community college course equivalencies and publicize an equivalency course crosswalk to ensure transfer of credit uniformity and transparency. Additional general education, pre-major, and elective courses in the associate degree should be selected based on a student’s intended major and the baccalaureate degree plan published by the senior institution.

The specific number and distribution of courses used to fulfill the requirement in each of these areas will be identified by each community college as meeting its own general education requirements. The Universal General Education Transfer Component and Other Required General Education courses will be drawn from those courses designated in the North Carolina Community College Combined Course Library as being transferable general education. This will preserve the autonomy of each community college to develop its own general education program, including those aspects that make its program unique.

Transfer of Associate in Arts and Associate in Science degree programs. 

  1. The ICAA enables North Carolina community college graduates of two-year associate in arts and associate in science degree programs who are admitted to signatory institutions of the NCICU to transfer with junior status if they follow the senior institution’s published baccalaureate degree completion plans.
  2. Senior institutions cannot place requirements on students transferring under the ICAA that are not required of their native students.
  3. Students who completes the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree prior to transfer to the senior institution will have fulfilled the senior institution’s lower-division general education requirements.
  4. Due to degree requirements in some majors, additional courses at the senior institution may be required beyond the general education courses and pre-major courses taken at the community college.

Community college graduates of the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree programs who have earned 60 semester hours in approved transfer courses with a grade of “C” or better and an overall GPA of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale will receive at least 60 semester hours of academic credit upon admission to a Signatory Institution of the ICAA.

  1. Requirements for admission to some major programs may require additional pre-specialty courses beyond the pre-major taken at the community college. Students entering such programs may need more than two academic years of course work to complete the baccalaureate degree, depending on requirements of the program.
  2. All courses approved for transfer in the ICAA are designated as fulfilling general education or pre- major/elective requirements. While general education and pre-major courses may also be used as electives, elective courses may not be used to fulfill general education requirements.
  3. ICAA courses taken beyond the 60-61 SHC of credit in which the student received a grade of less than a “C” will not negate the provisions of the ICAA.

Students not completing the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degrees. A North Carolina community college student who satisfactorily completes, with a grade of “C” or better, courses identified in the Universal General Education Transfer Component will receive equivalency credit applied toward the senior institution’s lower-division general education course requirements, subject to the following distribution limit: maximum of 6 hours in English Composition, 9 hours in Humanities/Fine Arts/Communications, 9 hours in Social/Behavioral Sciences, 8 hours in Mathematics, and 8 hours in the Natural Sciences.

A North Carolina community college student who satisfactorily completes a transfer course that is not designated as a Universal General Education Transfer Component course will receive transfer credit for the course. The receiving institution will determine whether the course will count as general education, pre-major, or elective credit.

Certificate of Universal General Education Transfer Component Courses, Associate in Carts Degree or Associate in Science Degree Completion. Certification of completion of the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree is the responsibility of the community college at which the courses are successfully completed. Transcript identification of Universal General Education Transfer Component courses is also the responsibility of the community college at which the courses are completed. The transcripts of students who transfer before completing the degree will be evaluated on a course-by-course basis by the receiving university. The transferring student who has not completed the degree must meet the receiving institution’s general education requirements.

Four-Year Degree Plan for Community College Transfer Students. Beyond the Universal General Education Transfer Component courses, a program of study leading to the associate degree contains courses related to a student’s baccalaureate major or program emphasis. Each senior institution will develop, publish, and maintain four-year baccalaureate degree completion plans identifying community college courses that provide pathways leading to associate degree completion, admission into the major, and baccalaureate completion. Students who complete the AA or AS degree and the degree plan tracks published by the senior institution, and who are accepted into that institution and into that major within four years of initial enrollment at the community college, will continue into that major at the senior institution with all courses fulfilling lower division general education and other degree requirements

Transfer of courses taken in other associate degree programs. Upon admission to a Signatory Institution of the ICAA, a community college student who was enrolled in an Associate in Applied Science (AAS) or Associate in Fine Arts (AFA) degree program and who satisfactorily completed the courses with a grade of “C” or better in all courses that are designated for college transfer will receive credit for those courses. Students completing courses designated Universal General Education Transfer Component will receive equivalent general education course credit for those courses at the receiving institution. For courses not designated as Universal General Education Transfer Component, the receiving institution will determine whether the course will count as general education or pre-major/elective credit. Students in these programs who transfer must meet the general education requirements of the receiving institution.

Articulation of Associate in Fine Arts or Associate in Applied Science degree programs may be handled through bilateral articulation agreements. Under bilateral agreements, individual senior institutions and one or more community colleges may join in a collaborative effort to facilitate the transfer of students from AFA or AAS degree programs to baccalaureate degree programs.

Transfer of courses not originated at North Carolina community colleges. Transfer courses that do not originate at a North Carolina community college may be used under the ICAA with the following stipulations:

  1. Courses must be completed at a regionally accredited (e.g., SACSCOC) institution of higher education;
  2. Courses must meet general education requirements; and
  3. Courses may total no more than 14 semester hours of general education course credit.
  4. For courses not originating at a NC community college, if the courses are used to complete the AA or AS, the courses will transfer as part of the degree. Otherwise, if 14 hours or less are presented without completion of the AA or AS, then the receiving institution will consider the courses on a course-by-course basis.

Transfer of Advanced Placement (AP) course credit. Advanced Placement (AP) course credits, awarded for a score of three or higher, are acceptable as part of a student’s successfully completed Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree under the ICAA. Students who receive AP course credit at a community college, but do not complete the Associate in Arts or Associate in Science degree will have AP credit awarded on the basis of the senior institution’s AP policy.

Transfer Credit Appeal

If a transfer student perceives that the terms of the ICAA have not been honored, he or she may follow the Transfer Credit Appeal Procedure as outlined in Appendix C of the ICAA located at http://www.nccommunitycolleges.edu/sites/default/files/basic-pages/academic- programs/attachments/icaa_with_signatures_04.30.2018_1.pdf.

Students Enrolled Prior to Fall Semester 2014

The 2015 ICAA is based on the community college AA and AS degrees which were effective for students beginning their enrollment at a community college for Fall Semester 2014. Students enrolled at a North Carolina community college prior to Fall Semester 2014 are subject to the conditions and protections contained in the ICAA in place at the time of their initial community college enrollment as long as they have remained continuously enrolled.

Academic Progress / Probation / Suspension / Reinstatement

Southeastern Community College policies for academic progress are designed to assist students in successfully completing their program of study. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of their academic progress. Counseling, tutoring services, and faculty advising are available to help students maintain satisfactory academic progress.

Students working toward completion of a degree, diploma, or certificate, must complete all courses in their program with a minimum 2.0 grade point average (GPA) to be eligible for graduation. Other programs may have additional requirements, and students are directed to meet with their advisor to review grade policy and requirements for their particular program.

All students are subject to the academic progress policy, including those not seeking degrees. Satisfactory academic progress will be determined based on the final grades and a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA for attempted credit hours.

Unsatisfactory progress is defined as follows:

Academic Probation

Students who have earned less than a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA are placed on academic probation. When a student’s cumulative GPA reaches or exceeds 2.0, he or she will be removed from academic probation and considered to be in good standing. A student who has been on academic probation for two consecutive semesters of attendance may be subject to academic suspension. A student is notified by Rams Mail of his/her status and the steps that must be taken to remove the status of probation.

Students on academic probation must make an appointment to meet with their faculty or academic advisor to register. The advisor may:

  • Limit their enrollment to nine (9) credit hours or less for the semester.
  • Prescribe specific developmental or required courses for enrollment.
  • Specify the mechanism by which courses are delivered, e.g., student may be restricted from taking any online courses.
  • Require the student to meet with the advisor at various times throughout the semester to discuss the student’s academic progress.
  • Require students with a grade of “F” to repeat failed course(s) before registering for new additional courses in the subsequent semester.

Academic Suspension

A student may be placed on academic suspension for consistent failure to show active initiative toward fulfillment of his/her chosen educational goal. A student remains on academic suspension for a minimum of one semester. A student is notified by Rams Mail of his or her status and the steps that must be taken to remove the status of academic suspension.

Students who wish to appeal the academic suspension must follow the Student Grievance Process.

Reinstatement Students seeking to return to Southeastern Community College after academic suspension must meet with their advisor to discuss their program of study and course selection. The advisor will notify the registrar’s office and the student’s status will be returned to Academic Probation. Credit hours may be restricted. Students raising their cumulative GPA to 2.0 or above will return to good standing.

Students receiving financial aid must meet all the requirements of the financial aid progress policy. Students are advised to contact the financial aid office (910.788.6214) regarding their status.

 Academic Fresh Start

Academic Fresh Start is designed for students who have a GPA lower than a 2.0 in their initial period of enrollment at Southeastern Community College and who have resumed their post-secondary education after a period of re-enrollment in which they have made significant improvements in their academic achievement. A student who has not been enrolled in curriculum courses at the college for three years (36 months) and then re-enrolls may request Academic Fresh Start from the director of student services.

  • The returning student must be enrolled the semester prior to making the request, having completed a minimum of six credit hours within a period of one year (12 months) in his/her curriculum, and must be in a curriculum program having earned at least a C grade in every course attempted since reentry.
  • The request must be made within twelve months of re-enrollment at the college.
  • Responses to requests for fresh start will be made within five working days of receipt of the request.

If approved, the student’s new grade point average (GPA) will be recalculated including all previous courses with a C or better. These courses can be applied to meet graduation requirements.

  • To meet program completion/graduation requirements, the student must complete a minimum of one-half the total credit hours required in the program after the Academic Fresh Start re-enrollment period has begun.
  • Previous major courses of C or better will be treated like transfer courses where grades are not assigned.
  • Transfer institutions may not acknowledge Academic Fresh Start. They may consider all credits and may calculate the student’s entire GPA for their purposes. It is at the discretion of the transfer institution to determine how they will interpret this policy.
  • Academic Fresh Start may not affect admission or readmission to a health technology program at Southeastern Community College.
  • Due to federal regulations, the Financial Aid Office does not acknowledge Academic Fresh Start when calculating eligibility for financial aid.
  • Approval of a request for recalculation of grade point average under this policy is only granted once for each student.

Effective Fall 2020

FINANCIAL AID

The college provides the opportunity for all students to apply for federal, state and local financial aid programs. The college administers these programs in accordance with all applicable rules and regulations. (Policy 4.07)

PELL GRANT – WORK STUDY

The Federal Pell Grant is an award made to undergraduate students to help pay for their education after high school. The Free Application for Federal Financial Aid (FAFSA) must be completed at www.fafsa.gov and received by the college’s Financial Aid Office before consideration can be made for this grant. It does not require repayment.

SCHOLARSHIPS

More than 80 privately funded scholarships are offered through the SCC Foundation, Inc. These scholarships must be applied for independently of financial aid. A list of scholarships and application guidelines may be viewed online at Scholarships.

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS REQUIREMENTS FOR FINANCIAL AID RECIPIENTS

FINANCIAL AID PROCEDURES

FINANCIAL AID WARNING

To determine your academic progress status and eligibility for financial aid, your academic record will be evaluated at the end of each term. Following the first term of failure to maintain cumulative satisfactory academic progress, you will be granted one term to regain satisfactory academic progress. This term is known as your “Warning” term. During your Warning term, you may continue to receive financial aid provided you are otherwise eligible.

Participation in the following success strategies while on warning may positively impact students’ performance as well as positively impact any appeal due to the loss of financial aid. It is recommended that students do the following.

  1. Complete the one-hour “Academic Success Workshop” during the semester on warning.
  2. Meet with student’s Success Coach or Academic Advisor twice during the semester on warning.
  3. Consider repeating failed courses within a program of study.
  4. Consider limiting enrollment to ten hours or less for the semester.
  5. Consider the mode (face-to-face, hybrid, online) and length (16 weeks, 12 weeks, 8 weeks, other) of courses for the semester.
  6. Visit or access student success services such as computer lab, Upswing Tutoring or workshops provided by an instructor or success coach.

If you are able to regain satisfactory academic progress with the courses completed successfully during your Warning term, the Warning status is lifted. If you have not regained satisfactory academic progress, you are placed on Financial Aid Suspension and you are no longer eligible for financial aid at SCC until your cumulative progress is again satisfactory.

FINANCIAL AID SUSPENSION

Students who fail to meet the conditions of a warning, which are to maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 and complete 67% of classes attempted, are placed on suspension. Once on suspension, the student will be notified of the termination of financial aid. Students who are placed on suspension forfeit their financial aid. Students may either appeal to have their financial aid eligibility reinstated or may notify the financial aid office once they are meeting the satisfactory academic progress policy for students receiving financial aid so that their financial aid eligibility can be reconsidered.

Below are options to regain financial aid eligibility:

FINANCIAL AID PROBATION

Students who are suspended may appeal to the Financial Aid office to have their financial aid eligibility reinstated. The reinstatement is for one probationary payment period (semester). (See the appeal process outlined below). A student on probation may not receive financial aid for the subsequent payment period unless:

  1. The student is now meeting the financial aid satisfactory academic progress policy at the end of the probation period (semester).
  2. The Financial Aid office determines the student met the requirements specified in the Financial Aid Student Success Plan.

CONTINUED PROBATION

As long as the student continues to make progress as identified by the Financial Aid Student Success Plan, the student will remain eligible for financial aid on continued probation until the expiration date of their Financial Aid Student Success Plan. Students will be notified of their status at the end of each payment period (semester) or when they first apply for financial aid.

FINANCIAL AID APPEAL PROCESS

Students who are suspended for not making satisfactory academic progress standards may appeal to the Financial Aid Office for reinstatement of financial aid eligibility for one semester if they have extenuating circumstances which are generally beyond their control such as death in the immediate family, serious illness or injury, etc. The procedure for appeal is:

  1. Complete and submit the appropriate Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeals Request form with all required documentation by designated deadline. Appeal forms may be obtained from the financial aid website or the financial aid office.
  2. The student will indicate in writing to the Financial Aid Office the reasons why he/she did not make satisfactory academic progress and why his/her financial aid should not be suspended.
  3. Documentation to support the appeal is required and must be attached to the appeal form. Appeals submitted without documentation will not be reviewed.

APPROVED APPEALS

If your appeal is approved, you will be placed on “Probation with Appeal” and expected to follow your Financial Aid Student Success Plan as implemented by Financial Aid Office until the completion of current program of study or expiration of the Plan.

Students that fail to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress during the probationary semester or as designated in the Financial Aid Student Success Plan, may be denied for future financial aid. At this point, students may be referred to the Satisfactory Academic Appeals Committee. The Satisfactory Academic Appeals Committee (SAP Committee) will review the appeal and documentation to determine whether or not students’ financial aid eligibility will be reinstated. Students will be able to view the decision on their Self-Service account under Financial Aid Information. Submission of an appeal does not guarantee reinstatement of eligibility for financial aid. Each appeal is reviewed on a case by case basis. Paying out of pocket for classes or sitting out a semester is not grounds for reinstatement of aid. Students must bring their academic progress back into compliance or have an appeal approved to have aid reinstated.

Subsequent appeals may be requested for consideration but you will not be allowed to submit it for the same issue that led to the first appeal, such as the same medical condition. A student must have very unusual circumstances to warrant a second appeal.

DENIED APPEALS

If a student’s appeal is denied or if the student does not meet the conditions of an approved appeal, the student will be asked to attend at his/her own expense and earn the deficiency either in the hours, GPA or both (a student cannot make up a deficiency if his/her appeal was due to exceeding the maximum timeframe to earn a degree). If a student did not maintain SAP due to a deficiency in credit hours, a student may take the credit hours at another institution as long as SCC accepts the transfer hours. After the student completes the semester (or semesters), he/she must submit an appeal form to the Financial Aid Office so his/her progress can be reevaluated.

The decision of the Satisfactory Appeals Committee is final.

NOTE: All notices regarding students’ academic progress for financial aid purposes will be available through the Financial Aid section of students’ Self-Service account. Students are responsible for monitoring this information.

FINANCIAL OBLIGATIONS AND BUSINESS RELATIONSHIPS

The accountability of the college for its various fiscal and business relationships with students is dictated in part by the regulations governing the college and in part by its desire to encourage students to maturely and responsibly meet their commitments in these areas. The college assumes no responsibility for, nor acts in the collection of, privately incurred debts or obligations involving students in relationships with parties outside the college. (Policy 4.02)

RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCES

In compliance with N.C.G.S. 115D-5, as amended in the 2010 legislative session, and 23 N.C.A.C. 02C.0213 of the state administrative code, students are permitted a minimum of two excused days each academic year for religious observances required by their faith. Students will be entitled to make up any tests or other work missed due to an excused absence for a religious observance. To be eligible for these excused absences, students must complete the written application process within the appropriate time frame. (Policy 3.07)

RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCES FOR CURRICULUM CLASSES

Students are permitted to request two excused absences each academic year for religious observances required by the faith of the student and are entitled to make up any tests or other work missed. The following process delineates how to obtain and use these absences: (Procedure 3.07.01)

  1. At least 48 hours prior to the beginning of the class or two weeks prior to the religious observance, whichever is later, the student will notify the campus Help Center in writing either by completing the paper form in the library at the Help Center desk or via email from his/her Rams mail account to HelpCenter@sccnc.edu.
  2. The email and/or form must include the student’s name, ID number, date to be missed for religious observance, brief description of the religious observance, classes that will be missed due to the religious observance (including course/section numbers, course titles and instructors’ names).
  3. After verifying that the student still has religious observance days remaining, the Help Center staff will email the student and all indicated instructors that the student is using a religious observance day for the date requested.
  4. Upon receipt of the email, the student should immediately contact their instructor(s) to arrange appropriate make-up work.
  5. The student make-up work may be completed any time after notification of the instructor by the Help Center or within five school days after the absence. If fewer than five school days remain in the term, the student may receive an “I” in the course and finish the course during the next term.
  6. If the make-up work is completed in the appropriate time frame, the student will receive credit for the missed work with no penalty. If the make-up work is not completed in the appropriate timeframe, the student will receive no credit for the missed work.

REPETITION OF CURRICULUM COURSES

Students who earn a grade below a “C” in a course or who completed the course five or more years earlier are allowed to repeat curriculum courses to improve the grade received in the course, to refresh their knowledge of the subject, or to refresh their skills in the subject. Additionally, students may repeat a course if mandated by their program of study. The Vice President of Academic Affairs will approve any exceptions to the above on an individual basis. Southeastern Community College is subject to funding agency requirements related to the repetition of courses; therefore, student may not be able to repeat previously taken courses and receive benefits. (Procedure 3.01.13)

TUITION REFUNDS

Tuition refunds are made only under the following circumstances:

  • A full refund will be made if the college cancels a class.
  • A pre-registered curriculum student who officially drops from a curriculum class or from the college before the first day of the semester may request a 100% refund.
  • A 75% refund may be made if a student officially drops from a curriculum class on or before the 10% point of the course.
  • Students who fail to follow proper drop procedures forfeit all refunds.
  • Student fees, including administrative, laboratory, malpractice insurance (if required for a program of study), and graduation fees cannot be refunded except in the case of courses canceled by the college.

To begin the refund process, a student must complete a drop form, which is available in the Registrar’s Office. Refund checks are generated after a student completes the necessary form to drop a course within the designated refund period. The tuition refund check is mailed to the student’s address on record at the college. Contact the Business Office at 910.788.6329 for any questions or concerns about tuition refunds. (Policy 6.09 & Procedure 6.09.01)

RESEARCH POLICY

Living Subjects Involved in Research
In an effort to support and encourage research, Southeastern Community College is committed to protecting living subjects from any harm, specifically with regard to safety, informed consent, and confidentiality. The college has established an Institutional Review Board (IRB) which is responsible for ensuring that all living subjects involved in research are treated fairly and ethically. Any proposed research that involves living subjects must be reviewed and approved by the IRB prior to being implemented. (Policy 3.8)

CURRICULUM FINAL GRADE APPEAL PROCESS

Grades are determined by the course instructor and must be based on a fair and consistent system for all students. Students may appeal the final course grade using the following process:

Appeals concerning final grades given for a course must be directed to the faculty member who assigned the grade. The student should contact the faculty member and request an initial conference to discuss the grade.  The faculty member assigning the grade and the student appealing the grade shall discuss the issue and attempt to resolve the difference. Every reasonable effort should be made to resolve the issue during the conference. This initial conference should occur within five business days of the end of the term. If the faculty and student fail to reach a satisfactory resolution, the student may appeal the grade by following these steps:

  1. The student shall present a written letter of appeal to the appropriate division chair within five business days after the conference with the instructor.
    1. The letter of appeal must contain the following components:
      1. Date, student’s name, student’s signature, student’s SCC email address, and student’s current telephone number.
      2. Prefix and number of course for the grade being appealed.
      3. Name of instructor issuing the grade.
      4. The date of the conference with the instructor.
      5. The grade the student received and the grade the student believes he or she should have received.
      6. An explanation, in three pages or less, listing and describing factual and valid reasons why the student thinks the assigned grade is incorrect.  The letter must specifically describe the student’s reasoning for appealing the grade.  This reasoning must be logical and based on their perception of a discrepancy in how the grading policy in the syllabus was incorrectly applied, or how they believe the grade was not based on a fair and consistent system for all students.  In ideal situations, the student will have clear documentation that supports their reasoning.  Unsubstantiated information, hearsay, and/or information irrelevant to the grading policy may not be included in the letter of appeal.
      7. The chair may return the letter to the student and recommend clarification, additional factual information, and/or removal of irrelevant information, hearsay, or unsubstantiated information.  If the chair recommends revisions, the student must submit the revised letter to the division chair within 1 business day after being notified of the need for modifications.
    2. The chair may deny the appeal if the letter of appeal does not conform to the stipulations described above.  Should the chair deny the letter of appeal, the student may appeal the decision to the Vice President of Academic Affairs (VPAA) (See step 2).
    3. If the chair accepts the letter of appeal, the division chair shall confer with the student and faculty member and attempt to seek resolution by mutual agreement.
    4. The division chair will make a decision to uphold the grade or change the grade based on the conversations with the faculty member and the student.
  2. If the student wishes to appeal the decision of the division chair, the student must submit the letter of appeal to the Vice President of Academic Affairs (VPAA) within five business days of the decision of the chair.
  3. The VPAA may require the student to adjust the letter of appeal in a way that will bring clarification, remove irrelevant information, or add additional factual information.  If adjustments to the letter are required, the student must submit changes within 1 business day of receiving the recommendations from the VPAA.
  4. Upon receipt of a satisfactory letter of appeal, the VPAA will convene the Academic Review Committee.  The meeting will be scheduled within 7 business days of the receipt of the approved letter of appeal delivered to the VPAA.
  5. The Academic Review Committee will consist of four faculty members (two technical, two general education), at least one of whom, if possible, shall be qualified to teach the course; a division chair (technical or general education); and a student representative. The division chair will not be the chair who is responsible for the course that is the focus of the grade appeal.  The faculty member assigning the grade does not serve on the committee. During the appeal process, the appropriate division chair and/or faculty member will provide all relevant information to the Academic Review Committee. The student’s written letter of appeal will also be provided to the committee.
  6. The division chair will serve as the chair of the Academic Review Committee.  He or she will not vote, but will ensure the meeting is fair, civil, and efficient.  Participants must follow the directions from the chair.
  7. The committee may reject the appeal if the procedures describe herein have not been followed by the student.
  8. The faculty member and student shall be afforded the opportunity to personally appear and provide pertinent information to the committee and to ask questions of anyone providing documentation to the committee. Upon receipt of all relevant information, the committee shall determine whether the grade assigned by the instructor shall be upheld or overturned.
  9. Should the committee find that the grade received by the student is appropriate, the committee chair will communicate the decision to the VPAA, and upon approval by the VPAA, draft a response to the student within five business days.
  10. If the grade is not upheld, the committee shall make a decision as to how the grade shall be assigned to the student and will communicate the decision to the VPAA. If the VPAA approves the committee’s decision, the Vice President shall notify, in writing, the faculty member; the student; and the appropriate faculty chair of the committee’s decision within five business days. The grade change must be submitted using the established college process.
  11. If the VPAA does not approve the committee’s decision, the Vice President will respond to the student, the faculty member, the appropriate faculty chair, and the committee members, with his/her decision within five business days of the committee meeting.
  12. Failure of a student to pursue a grade appeal in accordance with the provisions of this process or any publications derived therefrom shall be deemed unacceptable and the grade assigned will be the grade of record.
  13. The decision of the VPAA is final.

This process shall apply to all credit courses offered by the college regardless of length, credit awarded, method of delivery, time of delivery or other factors.

Distance Education

The college seeks to provide learning opportunities for students without the restrictions of time and place.  The college offers internet courses, hybrid courses, and blended courses.

Internet Courses. These classes are delivered over the Internet using devices such as a computer. These courses may have proctored testing, but instruction is delivered online. In order to take an Internet course at SCC, students are required to have a personal computer at home or access to a computer elsewhere. (The SCC Computer Labs and the SCC Library have Internet/computer stations that may be used by students.)

In order to sign up for these courses, students must know (at a minimum) how to use the Internet, how to use Microsoft Word, and how to save a file to portable media. They must be able to send an email message with a document attached. In addition, students registering for specific courses may be required to have additional software as specified in the course syllabus at the time of enrollment. If students enter Internet courses without the minimum computer skills or software, they may be dropped from those courses.

Students enrolling in an Internet course must complete a required Enrollment Key Quiz. This quiz can be completed online by accessing the Internet course section via Rams Online and represents the student’s first day of attendance in the course.  Students not completing this quiz will be reported as “never attending” the course.

Blended Courses. These classes are delivered primarily by face-to-face meetings but have some (up to 50%) required over the Internet through the computer. In order to take a web-assisted course at SCC, students are required to have a personal computer at home or access to a computer elsewhere. (The SCC Library has Internet/computer stations that may be used by students.)

In order to sign up for these courses, students should know (at a minimum) how to use the Internet, how to use Microsoft Word, and how to save a file to portable media. They must be able to send an e- mail message with a document attached. In addition, students registering for specific courses may be required to have additional software as specified in the course syllabus at the time of enrollment. If students enter Internet courses without the minimum computer skills or software, they may be dropped from those courses.

Students enrolling in a web-assisted course must complete a required Enrollment Key Quiz. This quiz can be completed online by accessing the web-assisted course section via Rams Online and represents the student’s first day of attendance in the course.  Students not completing this quiz will be reported as “never attending” the course.

Hybrid Courses. These classes are primarily delivered over the Internet (51-99%) through the computer but have some required face-to-face meetings. In order to take a hybrid course at SCC, students should have a personal computer at home or access to a computer elsewhere. (The SCC Library has Internet/computer stations that may be used by students.)

Hybrid courses may use technology to deliver instruction synchronously to more than one classroom simultaneously. The classrooms may be physical or virtual. This mode of delivery represents synchronous communication and emphasizes a simultaneous group learning experience. Instructor and students communicate in real time through interactive audio/video conferencing from one classroom to one or more remote classrooms across the state. Students attend a class at a specific time and in a specific place. In all cases, local and off- site, students are able to participate in the class as it is taking place in real time.

To sign up for these courses, students must know (at a minimum) how to use the Internet, how to use Microsoft Word, and how to save a file to portable media. They must be able to send an e-mail message with a document attached. In addition, students registering for specific courses may be required to have additional software as specified in the course syllabus at the time of enrollment. If students enter Internet courses without the minimum computer skills or software, they may be dropped from those courses.

Students enrolling in a hybrid course must complete a required Enrollment Key Quiz. This quiz can be completed online by accessing the hybrid course section via Rams Online and represents the student’s first day of attendance in the course.  Students not completing this quiz will be reported as “never attending” the course.   www.sccnc.edu/login/index.php.

 Progression to Graduation / Graduation / Academic Honors

Graduation Requirements

To receive a certificate, diploma, or degree, students must (1) complete all state-approved program requirements with a minimum cumulative program GPA of 2.0 (a C average), (2) complete a minimum of 25% of the total credit hours required in the program at SCC, (3) complete less than 25% of the total credit hours required in the program through credit for prior knowledge, experience, or certifications unless otherwise specified in the program, (4) apply for graduation, and (5) pay any outstanding fees and/or fines.

Graduation exercises are held at the end of the spring semester for all students who have completed degree requirements during the academic year to include those earning certificates. Prospective summer graduates who will enroll in their final coursework are allowed to participate in the spring ceremony. Students wishing to participate in the graduation ceremony must complete the online graduation application in Self-Service by the deadlines posted on the college website.  There is no fee to participate in the graduation ceremony except for purchasing a cap and gown from the official college vendor.  Students who are eligible to graduate who do not wish to participate in the graduation ceremony should also complete the online graduation application in Self-Service to assure the timely awarding of student degrees.

Students meeting the requirements for graduation may also be identified by the college and the students’ degrees will automatically award the degree. The college will notify students that have met the requirements for graduation and will award those students with appropriate credentials. While the college will make every effort to identify students that have met the requirements for graduation, students are ultimately responsible for monitoring their progress toward graduation and submitting a graduation application in the final semester of their program.

Program Progression to Graduation

Students entering into a program of study leading to a diploma or degree must remain in continuous attendance fall and spring semesters in order to graduate with the diploma or degree requirements in place at the time they enter the college. If a program has required summer term courses, students must also remain in continuous attendance during summer terms to meet those requirements as well.

Requirements must be completed within a five-year period from date of entry. If program requirements are not met within the five-year period, students must meet the requirements in effect at the conclusion of that five-year period within the next five years. (Some programs of study have more restrictive requirements than these, e.g. Associate Degree in Nursing. Refer to the particular degree requirements in this catalog.

If students discontinue working toward a degree or diploma, they will, upon reentry to the college, be required to complete degree requirements in effect at the time of reentry, whether to the same program in which they were previously enrolled or a new one. Students who change programs must meet the requirements of the new program. Students cannot return to the old program requirements once they have been moved to a new program or program year. However, students may choose to adopt new program requirements which went into effect after their entry by requesting to be moved to a new program year.

Once they make the choice, they may not return to the older requirements.

If students completed courses to be applied toward a certificate, diploma, or degree that are over ten years old, the college reserves the right to require the student to demonstrate current knowledge in the course area or require that the course be repeated. (Some programs of study have more restrictive requirements on timeliness of coursework. Refer to a particular program in the college catalog for any specific information.)

ACADEMIC HONORS

Recognition of full-time students who excel in their academic work at SCC includes the following:

  1. Full-time students who are enrolled in a degree, diploma, or certificate program and who earn a GPA of 3.5 to 3.749 (with no I, D, or F grades) will be recognized on the semester Dean’s List. Students who earn a GPA for the semester of 3.75 or better under the conditions stated above will be recognized on the President’s List.
  2. Two-year degree students who maintain a cumulative program GPA of at least 3.50 on 12 or more credit hours per semester are invited to join Phi Theta Kappa, a national honor society for junior college students.
  3. Students having a program GPA of 3.5 or above at graduation are awarded special recognition during the graduation ceremony.  Various divisions may also recognize outstanding students during the SGA Academic Awards Ceremony held each year at the end of spring semester.

 Work-Based Learning

 The Work-Based Learning (WBL) Program gives students the opportunity to integrate classroom study with practical work experience in their major field. Generally, students alternate study and work periods or work part time while enrolled at the college.

Student Eligibility Requirements

  1. Minimum age to participate in work-based learning is subject to the rules and regulations of the North Carolina Department of Labor (NCDOL) Youth Employment Laws, the United States Department of Fair Labor Standards Act, as well as State Board of Community Colleges Code that apply to students participating in curriculum courses in general. Colleges should inform students under the age of 18 that they must complete an online NCDOL Youth Employment Certificate. The responsibility for filing the certificate lies with the employer.
  2. A student participating in a WBL course must be enrolled in the appropriate program and be considered in good academic standing and progressing in the program. Normally, this means that the student maintains a GPA of 2.0 or better in the program courses and has completed or is currently completing prerequisite and corequisite courses. Colleges must ensure that students take WBL courses in sequence with other program courses to enhance student learning.
  3. Students must have completed a minimum of nine semester hours within the appropriate program of study and a minimum of three semester hours from core classes within the major.
  4. Students must be recommended by their advisor as having the skills to be suitable employees.

Insurance Requirements

There are several types of insurance coverage for which students and employers must be provided information before accepting any WBL position.

  1. Accident Insurance. The student is highly encouraged to be covered by adequate health and accident insurance during a WBL experience. WBL students are highly encouraged to purchase their personal “accident” insurance, either through the college or through an individual policy. This insurance should cover the WBL student en route as well as on the work site. The WBL student may be required to provide the name of the insurance company and policy number on the “Placed Student Information Worksheet” prior to beginning the WBL activity, if not automatically covered by the college student insurance policy. This information should be placed in the student’s WBL file.
  2. Workman’s Compensation Insurance. The employer may be required to provide “workman’s compensation” coverage at the place of employment for the WBL student (for paid positions) during the entire length of the WBL activity. North Carolina law requires all employers to provide this coverage if employing three (3) or more employees.
  3. Unemployment Insurance. By action of the federal government and the North Carolina General Assembly, WBL students may not apply for unemployment insurance based upon WBL employment. Therefore, unemployment insurance premiums shall not be paid on WBL students working in the state. NOTE: Reference the General Statutes of NC, 1974 Cumulative Supplement, Chapter 96-8, Section G, No 16 and the ratification of HB247, on April 2, 1985, Section 1.G.S.
  4. Additional Insurance Information
    1. A college may require WBL students to obtain professional liability insurance from the college (in addition to accident insurance). Typically, this requirement is for early childhood, human services, and nursing curriculums.
    2. An employer may provide health and accident insurance for WBL students as a benefit of employment.
    3. An employer may require that a WBL student enrolled in an Early Childhood Program be covered by a “Child Care liability” insurance policy. If so, the provision of this insurance becomes the responsibility of the employer.

Academic Credit

Credit of one semester hour is awarded for satisfactory completion of each 160 hours of work experience. The WBL coordinator or faculty advisor will assign a grade for the WBL class based on reports submitted by the student, on-site visits, and employer evaluations.

A maximum of three credit hours may be earned in WBL per student per semester. The total maximum academic credit that may be earned through WBL depends on the credential.  For the Associate in Applied Science degree, 8 SHC may be earned.  A total of 4 SHC may be earned for a diploma.  And, a total of 2 SHC may be earned for the certificate.

Application Procedure

  1. Students should obtain a “Work-Based Learning Application” form from their advisors or WBL coordinator and make an appointment to review the completed application, along with a current resume and college transcript
  2. The advisors or WBL coordinator will conduct an in-depth interview with students regarding career interests and possible work assignments.
  3. The advisor or WBL coordinator will work with them to locate appropriate training positions and to complete appropriate documentation.

For further information, students should contact any division chair/director or the WBL coordinator.